Serving the Southern Illinois University community since 1916.

The Daily Egyptian

Serving the Southern Illinois University community since 1916.

The Daily Egyptian

Serving the Southern Illinois University community since 1916.

The Daily Egyptian

Grammy-worthy talent coming to 45th Sunset Concert Series beginning June 13
Grammy-worthy talent coming to 45th Sunset Concert Series beginning June 13
By Christi Mathis, SIU Communications • May 21, 2024

It’s the 45th season for one of Southern Illinois’ favorite summer traditions – the Sunset Concert Series – and this year’s exciting...

Saluki softball huddles together before facing the California Golden Bears in the first round of the NCAA Regional May 17, 2024 at Tiger Park in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Photo provided by Saluki Athletics
Salukis split doubleheader, advance to first Regional final since 2003
By Ryan Grieser, Sports Reporter • May 18, 2024

The SIU softball team is headed to its second-ever NCAA Regional final after beating California in back-to-back days in the Baton Rouge Regional...

Saluki softball huddles together before facing the California Golden Bears in the first round of the NCAA Regional May 17, 2024 at Tiger Park in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Photo provided by Saluki Athletics
Groff twins, defense send SIU to NCAA regional semifinals
By Ryan Grieser, Sports Reporter • May 17, 2024

Defense was the name of the game Friday as the SIU softball team took down the Cal Bears in the first round of NCAA Regionals in Baton Rouge,...

From Mexico to Maine: Celebrating the eclipse elsewhere

Photo+provided+by+NASA
Photo provided by NASA

Areas in Mexico, the United States and Canada observed with wonder as the solar eclipse happened Monday sweeping north and east across the continent.

 

The eclipse was first sighted in Mexico around 11:07 a.m. PDT and entered Texas at 1:27 p.m. CDT. It then traversed the U.S. before exiting through Maine around 3 p.m. EDT, proceeding into Canada.

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The last solar eclipse in the U.S. occurred in 2017. NASA reported variations in the path and timing of the 2024 eclipse that differed than that of 2017.

 

The path of totality was broader this time due to the moon’s closer proximity to Earth. It  covered more cities than its 2017 counterpart, allowing more people to witness totality.

 

NASA estimates 31.6 million people reside in this year’s path of totality, compared to 12 million for the 2017 eclipse.

 

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In 2017, Carbondale experienced the longest period of totality at 2 minutes and 42 seconds. This year, totality lasted up to 4 minutes and 28 seconds near Torreon, Mexico, and approximately 4 minutes and 26 seconds at the center of its path over the U.S.

 

Cities with optimal viewing opportunities included Dallas, Little Rock, Indianapolis, and Buffalo.

 

State police nationwide monitored roads, waterways, and airspace to manage potential congestion, ensuring smooth operations.

 

Investigators in Lorain County, Ohio, noted less traffic than expected and no major trouble. The Dallas Morning News and other nationwide news sources also report that they have avoided anticipated traffic concerns.

 

The Dallas Morning News reported travelers from France, Oklahoma, Florida, and New York stopping into the area to view the eclipse from some of their popular central district hotspots. The last time Dallas experienced totality was in 1878 and will not experience it again for another 300 years.

 

Other areas in Texas were able to view the eclipse as well, given that the moon was closer to the Earth this time.

 

“We were home. The animals went quiet, and the temperature got cooler,” a person from Hewitt, Texas said.

 

In Russellville, Arkansas, 300 couples gathered in a field for an ‘Elope at the Eclipse’ wedding event, earning the moniker “total eclipse of the heart” from The New York Post.

 

Russellville was ranked by NASA as one of the best places to view the eclipse, with totality lasting approximately 4 minutes.

 

In Indiana, thousands convened at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for a Total Solar Eclipse event hosted by Purdue University. The event drew attendees from across the U.S. and beyond, with hotel rooms in the area reaching $1,300.

 

Guest speakers at the IMS event included astronauts, NTT IndyCar Series drivers, and astronomy experts.

 

Cloud coverage in Buffalo, New York, hindered eclipse sightings, though occasional breaks allowed glimpses.

 

Maine experienced favorable weather for the eclipse, attracting additional travelers rerouted from Texas due to weather forecasts.

 

Houlton, Maine, witnessed the last moment of totality in the U.S., spanning 3 minutes and 18 seconds.

 

Large crowds gathered and were greeted by a three-day festival that included community meals, ensuring there would be food to feed the traveling spectators that entered the community. The turnout was successful, and organizers were pleased after spending more than 2 years in planning.

 

Although visible from numerous locations, those who missed the event can view live feeds and posts on various social media platforms.The videos and photos show the crowds buzzing with anticipation and delight whether it was their first time witnessing a solar eclipse or not.

 

The next U.S. solar eclipse is slated for August 22, 2044, with totality over North Dakota, Montana, and northern Canada. A coast-to-coast eclipse will span the lower 48 states on August 12th, 2045


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